excess fabric and alterations

I had high hopes for Burda 6722, having seen someone else review a lovely version. They had only needed to shorten the waist. If only my version had been as simple.

Alas, apart from lengthening the skirt by 20cm (a given, if I didn’t want to to create a top instead of a dress), extensive work was required to create a garment which looked flattering.

Here’s a list:

* shortened waist by 1cm
* took out lots of bunching fabric in my mid back by removing an almond shape wedge from the back (on top of the shortened waist) of another 1.5cm in total
* took in the sides from just above the waist to mid hip several times as it was way too big. Maybe a few inches in total?
* reduced the length of the sleeves to create cap sleeves

It’s been a relief to get it finished, as although technically it’s very quick to put together, I’ve spent the better part of an afternoon repeatedly trying it on to check if the adjustments I had made worked.

The nice thing about working with fabric which contains evenly spaced lines is that it’s nice and easy to keep things straight, for example when hemming. It does mean you have to carefully lay out your pattern pieces if you want all those nice lines to match at the side seams (I am very fussy about this!). If you look carefully at the photos below, I am pleased to say both side seams and sleeves all match ūüôā

I think I am going to need to top stitch the neckline, as due to the facing instructions (you fold the fabric over instead of the usual attach and sew) it shifts about a bit. Hopefully I will have photos soon of me wearing it. In the mean time, here’s the dress dummy showing the results:

Making short work of using up fabric

I’ve been busy cutting up the latest fabric (a cotton jersey) for a new project, which will be Burda 6722. It’s a nice navy, with a small white stripe. I quickly realised I was going to have leftover wasted fabric. I struggle not to make use of leftovers, so quickly succumbed to a mini project to make the best use of the extras.

I downloaded a pattern from a small independent called¬†Boo L√® Heart¬†(not something I usually do as I can’t be bothered to stick lots of pages together) but as these were shorts it was very quick. They were also nice and cheap (a few pounds) so fit the bill.

I quickly discovered that my fabric didn’t have enough stretch when I cut out the waist band. Not being in the habit of wearing corsets with shorts, some modifications were clearly in order. Luckily I hadn’t cut anything else out yet.

Changes made:

Added panel inserts in to waistband (5cm per panel), used wider seam allowance of 1cm for the back facing panel seams to prevent gapping at the back, and 5mm seams for the front facing seams of the panel.

Added a total of 8cm to the side seams (so 2cm per pattern piece side).

Added 3cm to the length for modesty

Changed the depth of the crotch curve by 5mm by reducing the seam allowance.

Reduced the waistband seam allowance to 5mm as I needed as much height as I could get.

Still need to finish attaching the inside of the waistband and complete the hemming. Currently only used 5mm (recommended to use 1cm, turn, then another cm).

But I am pleased with how these are turning out (also feeling proud I got all those lines to match up!). These aren’t intended for public outings, my fitness classes have been getting harder due to the heat so I hope these will help keep me more comfortable.

 

on to take 2

So, here is the top/dress on me. The actual silk version is going to be constructed in a bit as it will require a fair bit of time investment. Still, it’s nice to have a summer type top available. Excuse the mismatched sleeve lengths, I promise they are the same!

(k)not an easy project

My toile, bar tidying up all the many ravelling seams, is finally done. The elbow darts have been moved down, I’ve added a short skirt so it functions as a dressy top and I am in the process of removing the last stubborn tailor tacks. You have no idea how many this project has!

After putting my brain through such a complicated set of contortions I have decided to give it a calming break¬†by making a child’s denim skirt and matching sailor style¬†top. No darts or oddly shaped pieces to contend with.

After some struggling, I finally managed to get the toile on my dress dummy. It’s so close fitting I had a job getting it past the shoulders (I have the same problem getting it on myself, this pattern is not for the claustrophobic!).

So, here are some pictures. It does require some more pressing, but it’s the end of the day and I need to get some rest for work tomorrow.

 

crossed lines

So, work has commenced on Vogue 2401. I did so like the design, until I had finished sewing the neck, shoulder, elbow, bust and back darts. Then acquired a minor headache working my way through the origami like instructions. This pattern is not for the faint of heart!

Given I was going to be working with a) silk and b) chequered silk I figured a toile would be a Good Idea. Despite the amount of work required to make a bodice I’m glad I did as it’s looking a bit on the short side and it’s given me a chance to practice (read rip seams) without worrying about the delicate silk being torn to shreds.

Here is the progress so far, forgive the slightly awkward side pose, I am rubbish at taking photos of myself from an angle. I’ve left all the tailor tacks in so you can clearly see where the darts are. Any comments to help improve the fit are welcome!

I think the bodice needs to be lengthened and the elbow darts need to move downwards a bit.

time to line up a new project

It’s time to bid farewell to simplicity 1282, as it’s finally done. It’s taken longer than I would normally expect after having a busy time at work and with other events. I got to do lots of top stitching with this skirt around the waistband. It’s just a shame no one else will get to see all the work as close up as I have!

I normally line skirts but as this intended more for summer wear I didn’t add one. Which has been an opportunity to add some nice decorative touches I don’t normally use a turned over seam finish but it looks very pretty and is worth the effort. Given how badly this fabric frayed ignoring seam finishing was not an option….

I have used yet more of my bias binding (I love the two rolls of unpressed bias I bought so much, they were amazing value!) to finish off the hem and it has become my go to in order to create a more structured hem if it is looking a bit floppy.

So, on to Vogue 2401. Given the check pattern on the silk fabric I have chosen a toile seems to be a very sensible plan (I know, pinch me, I don’t normally invest in them) so I am hoping I won’t have to make too many amendments. I will report back soon – happily I have a whole weekend to enjoy and I intend to make the most of it.

the last stitch (in the ditch)

So, my skirt from Simplicity 1282 is nearly finished. The below photo is¬†before I put the zip in (which is now sorted) and I just need to add the facing. As this won’t be lined, it is nice and quick compared to some other projects!

Happily this pattern hasn’t required too many modifications fit wise. I’ve used a longer length due to my height, slightly narrowed the upper hip area, but left the waistband alone (my usual size 16).

Having lost a waistband pattern piece at some point I decided to use the facing for the front as the outer side, but used the split piece for the back. I quite like this as I really don’t need additional bulky round the tummy area from multiple seams. Although the denim isn’t really thick I have top stitched the waistband seams to ensure everything lies nice and flat, plus I think it looks pretty.

I’ve also used bias binding (in a nice contrasting red) to finish the hem line as I have noticed when A-line skirts with heavier fabric it can do with a bit of support structure wise otherwise it can struggle to kick out in the right shape.

 

photo3

check (out) the new fabric

20170325_191527.jpgI’ve been on holiday, busy at work, and am slowly progressing through making a denim skirt. But of course there is always time to shop for new fabric. I couldn’t pass up on this lovely silk, as it was only ¬£5 a meter. It’s going to become Vogue 2401.

Normally, although I love these vintage patterns, I don’t go for this type of thing as they fare fabric hogs, and if you really want to use nice fabric it would cost a small fortune. However, due to this lovely fabric I can justify making it.

I hope to post more soon about my skirt. It’s not going to be lined so should be a bit quicker to make!

sailing through easier waters

After my never seeming to end last project (I imagine everyone was ready to see some posts about something different than the suit I was working on) I was very pleased to start a quick and easy project.

I’ve always liked the little sailor outfits for children, so this fit the bill nicely. The dress is fully lined, and I have used a viscose blend fabric as an overlay to create a lace type effect. I used a white cotton as the under layer for the sleeves and collar. It’s worked well, and the overall colour now looks more cream. I think white for a small baby is a dirt magnet!

I’ve used french seams and under stitched everything. Nothing special to report about the pattern, other than that some of the notches don’t line up. I also always like to have a full¬†lining¬†(this one only lined the bodice). I am not convinced by the instruction to cut 4 of your fashion fabric for the bodice. Surely a softer fabric to line it with is better for a young child?

So, this is Mccalls M6913. View C with the sleeves form view B.

 

seeing green – for new projects

Finally, after what seems like an inordinate amount of time and focus, I can look forward to starting a new project. Yes, that means my jacket is finished! I decided to follow through with the existing green theme, which meant green bias binding around all the edges and a green facing. All matched with a green (in another shade) lining.

 

Getting the fit right has been an utter pain. I won’t be making this jacket again, as I am convinced there are easier patterns out there to make than this one. A real shame, as the skirt went together pretty well. Still, the result is a satisfying one. So, here we are, verdict anyone? I probably won’t wear this together much as it is a bit formal, but they make very nice separates.